Talking up teaching will help solve recruitment woes

(The original text of my article in TES Scotland 11th August 2017)

Recent suggestions that Scotland could soon have a “Teach First” system of teacher training should not come as a surprise. If you haven’t heard of Teach First, it is a charity set up to tackle educational disadvantage in England and Wales. Participants bypass traditional teaching routes to work directly with disadvantaged schools. Graham Donaldson first suggested something similar in his 2011 report, Teaching Scotland’s Future. But he clarified that “routes of this nature could complement” more traditional routes into teaching – and therein, perhaps, lies the rub.

If “traditional” teacher-education routes were still financed and supported as they always were in t

However, despite this “proud tradition”, we are struggling to recruit enough teachers. We have to look at all options now, surely? Well, no. We are struggling for numbers because successive Scottish governments have defunded education to such an extent that it is hardly the attractive profession it once was. And there’s a familiar ploy: defund something until it is barely able to function – then privatise. That’s what it will be: a firm step towards the privatisation of our education system.

So here’s a thought: perhaps making teaching an attractive prospect, not one used as political ping-pong by politicians, will attract graduates. Perhaps highlighting the work of teachers who do amazing things day in, day out, instead of focusing on the negatives, will attract graduates. Perhaps allowing us to showcase the skills we have and our love for the jobs we do will attract graduates. Perhaps paying us properly will attract graduates.

And another thing: please stop saying that Teach First-type routes attract “high-quality graduates”. That’s an insult to every teacher I know – all of them already high-quality graduates.

I don’t understand our willingness to accept the degradation of our teachers in society. We chose this profession because we wanted to change the world for the children we teach. We turn up every day, despite seemingly constant criticism from all sides. There are clearly recruitment issues, but there are simple ways to solve that. Open up and fund ITE programmes properly, don’t erode them until they disappear. Because that’s what will happen – believe me.

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