Believe it or not, there are good things happening in schools

Here’s the full version of my article in TES Scotland 20th January 2017

 

And, woe, we did revel in the Pisa disaster. We’re rubbish and getting worse. CfE has failed. We were happy to see bandied about, in this very magazine, phrases such as ‘all time low’ and ‘plunged’.

And, of course, it was bad. To think that there are less of our children reaching competent levels of literacy is unacceptable. However, the hyperbole of such language doesn’t help. Political outrage merely gets in the way; politicians merely get in the way. Pisa tells a story but a very narrow one and one which ignores the great things happening in all our schools.

As an English teacher, it is my life’s work to improve the literacy of every child who walks though may door. When I read about drops in standards, whatever that may mean, it hurts. Literacy is a human right. The ability to read and write should be a minimum expectation of every kid who goes to school. And most do. The misleading media attention on Pisa is an unfair reflection of what is happening in our schools and deflects from the majority who are achieving so much.

In the fortunate position of visiting schools on an annual basis, the wonderful things occurring never fail to amaze me. In my own school, in the last weeks before Christmas, I’ve watched children involved in debating to a very high standard, a jazz band, a ceilidh band, a concert band, a choir; I’ve read about their successes in football, rugby, netball. They are building rockets in the engineering club, coding, producing incredible art, winning creative writing competitions with poetry which would make you cry. They are, for the most part, polite and eloquent and funny and interesting and challenging.

Those things are happening in schools all over the country. However, that’s not in the news. Instead our children read and hear stories that they are struggling with literacy and numeracy and science. Yes, they read those too. Of course, we could turn this into a political debate on the merits of CfE; we can point fingers and blame. If there are barriers to literacy and numeracy inadvertently created by the curriculum, then they need to be overcome. If things need to change then they need to be changed. I’ll be at the front of the queue with the wrecking ball. But I won’t stand by and let the great work that’s happening in schools be ignored. I’m no apologist for CfE – any more. I was in the past – and see the flaws. So let’s speak up for the successes and tackle the failures; let’s collaborate and share the good things and challenge and dismiss the rubbish. We owe it to ourselves; we owe to our children.

One thought on “Believe it or not, there are good things happening in schools

  1. Nice one, Kenny! There is no magic bullet, no winning formula. No one ever said this was going to be easy. But we should all speak loud and proud about how much fun it can be and how much we care. And the effort we put in to make incredible learning take place.
    The system needs mended and society’s faults can be a broken mess. But teachers are not to blame for that. And especially not the pupils. PISA doesn’t look at H&W. Fortunately, we do.

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