The Scottish Government and Reading for Pleasure

IMG_0603This week First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced a new venture to encourage  primary-aged kids to read for pleasure. Part of her Government’s ongoing – and as yet unsuccessful – attempt to enhance literacy and narrow the attainment gap, children in primaries four to seven will be encouraged to read as many books as possible and write short reviews to win prizes for themselves and their schools. As one who has blogged, tweeted and presented at Teachmeets, on the importance of reading for pleasure, I’m delighted that this has been placed, to an extent, centre stage of a literacy push. I do worry slightly about the competitive element though.

The First Minister’s comments on reading for pleasure echo mine exactly: “Research … shows that reading for pleasure is crucially important for children’s development, and I hope this scheme goes a long way in encouraging Scotland’s young people to see reading as an important leisure activity as much as a school one.”  That we place reading for pleasure at the heart of any literacy development is vital, especially in the early years, if we are to develop life-long readers, and anything we can do to encourage that must be seen as a positive step. From experience, however, I think there may be some flaws with this venture.

Where it begins to fall down for me is the added burden of the book review. I’m not wholly against writing about reading but I think we open up areas of real difficulty for some kids if we mesh something which we present as being for pleasure with something else which has its own pitfalls. Writing book reviews, long or short, can be a wonderful experience for kids who are confident readers and writers. For reluctant readers, who we spend a lot of time encouraging and finding books for, the thought of writing at the end of a book can turn them off reading forever. They are faced with all of the issues they have with literacy: now hitched to something which was supposed to be about pleasure remember.

I also have an issue with choice. To paraphrase Donalyn Miller, writer of ‘The Book Whisperer – as I do time and time again – in order to create lifelong readers we must provide three things: time, choice and love. Closing down the choice of reading material to a set list chosen by adults is a potential disaster. Kids like to read books recommended by their friends. They may be terrible in our eyes but, with reluctant readers who we simply want to read, nothing should be off the table at first. Then, perhaps, later on we can start to push books their way. Book choices should not be limited to what adults think they should read.

However, despite these concerns, I welcome the Scottish Government’s new focus on Reading for Pleasure. I love the fact that Nicole Sturgeon is talking publicly about her favourite children’s books. We should all be doing the same in our classrooms and in our homes. I perhaps worry though that in order  to take this forward someone felt that it should be made into a competition. So one kid can read ten short books while another reads one long doorstopper: who should get a prize? If you teach kids you’ll probably know that reading for pleasure is not as big a disaster area as we are lead to believe. However, for those who are still reluctant readers we need to get this right.

First Minister’s Reading Challenge

One thought on “The Scottish Government and Reading for Pleasure

  1. Pingback: Education is a political football. Stop playing games with it. | Just Trying to be Better Than Yesterday

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